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View Call Day Online at callday.csl.edu!

April 22, 2013

calldayemailheader50KJoin Us Live

Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, will celebrate Call Day on Wednesday, May 1, 2013. More than 140 students will learn, many for the first time, where God is sending them for the next school year! The vicarage assignment service will be at 3:00 p.m. (CDT) and the call service will be at 7:00 p.m. (CDT). If you are unable to join us in person, we would love it if you followed along on our free live streaming of both services on callday.csl.edu!

On this site, you will be able to view live streams of both services, follow along with printable service bulletins, and after all assignments are announced, view the lists on an interactive map.

Please forward this email to your family members, friends, home congregations, and anyone else who may be interested in following along!

For technical questions, please call 314-505-7231 or email helpdesk@csl.edu.

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Christ Follower Today and Everyday

December 26, 2012

Then Jesus told his disciples, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it. For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world and forfeits his soul? Or what shall a man give in return for his soul? (Matthew 16:24-26 ESV)

How ironic for Christ to speak these words to His disciples. There is Christ on His journey to the Cross of Calvary, the ultimate sacrifice for God’s creation, and He is imparting knowledge not only to the disciples, but to you and I as well. Thankfully, Christ is preparing us for the future without Him walking among us. The disciples didn’t see it initially, but you and I see it clearly thanks to the scriptures.

Cross2BearAt the beginning and closing of each academic school year a cross to lead the way. As a student leader this is my cross to bear both figuratively and literally. Thus the picture to the right (credits to Mrs. Meyer). I think it is safe to say taking up our cross plays out in every part of our lives. It plays out in how we Witness to each other regardless of who is looking. It plays out in our acts of Mercy to our neighbors. It plays out in every facet of our Lives Together.

I often find that when we hear this scriptural text we equate the negative aspects of the life of the Christian; persecution, torment, and death. Allow me to offer yet another way to look at this text, a more positive way in light of the Christian life. Picking up our own crosses to follow Christ is linked directly to the various vocations in life.

Christ calls us and that call in creation is doing works (acts of mercy) for one’s neighbor. Luther often speaks about various vocations which range from your job to life in the family. In other words, in every place and vocation that you serve, you are to live out your faith with such work that serves others. This is work not done to earn favor with God, but to glorify God to the fullest. What do you know it is even scriptural that we see picking up our crosses and live this way…

And one of the scribes came up and heard them disputing with one another, and seeing that he answered them well, asked him, “Which commandment is the most important of all?” Jesus answered, “The most important is, ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.” (Mark 12:28-31 ESV).

Picking up our respective crosses means living out our faithfulness to the Scriptures and Confessions. It means being unwavering servants to Christ the Church, and all of God’s creation. It means we are to be responsive to the contemporary context of the world by being lights of the Gospel in the ever growing darkness. It especially means we are to do everything in excellence to the glory of God (in other words, no half stepping when it comes to the work in the service of God and our neighbors).

Picking up our crosses comes with negative aspects, but that should never be our focus. Our focus lies in the Cross. Our focus is sustained through the sure promise of the Second Coming. Pickup up our cross means our focus is always on someone other than ourselves.

Then Jesus told his disciples, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it. For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world and forfeits his soul? Or what shall a man give in return for his soul? For the Son of Man is going to come with his angels in the glory of his Father, and then he will repay each person according to what he has done. Truly, I say to you, there are some standing here who will not taste death until they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.” (Matthew 16:24-28 ESV)

Picking up our cross to follow Christ means to deny oneself. Your lives in Christ are to be lived for your neighbor. That my friends is the meaning of picking a cross and following Christ.

September 22, 2012

Originally posted on The Blog of St. Mark:

Maybe you’ve seen it?  The bumper sticker uses the Muslim crescent, the peace symbol, a symbol for gay rights, the David’s star, the pagan pentagram, the Taoist ying-yang, and the Christian cross to spell out the word “coexist.”  The message?  “Can’t we all just get along since we’re not all that different?”

Last weekend I saw another version that used similar symbols to spell out the word “contradict.”  Written underneath: “They can’t all be true – John 14:6.”

One of my friends on facebook shared this and got some blowback from his friends.  Some said, “Why is it that YOUR truth is the truth?”  “How can you use words written by lots of guys over centuries and reinterpreted by others for their own ends to prove your point?”  My friend did an excellent job of pointing his friends back to the Scriptures, which say plainly, “Jesus is the way,” and…

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Call Day Post by Rev. Schmidt

May 1, 2012

ericekong:

A very fitting blog posts on Call Day from Rev. Schmidt.

Originally posted on Such a time as this - Esther 4:14:

On Wednesday, April 25, 2007, I sat in the Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus on the campus of Concordia Seminary, St. Louis and patiently waited to hear the words: Michael Schmidt – Kansas District – Peace Lutheran Church – Natoma, Kansas.

Prior to that moment, I had never been to Kansas, never thought I would live in Kansas, and never even heard of Natoma.  Prior to that moment, I was a typical east coast person who thought Kansas consisted of Kansas City, Wichita, and Topeka, and that was it; but now, I was the newest resident of the state, and I would reside at least 3 hours west of Wichita and Topeka, and 6 hours west of Kansas City.

However, despite what so many say, my experience that night was not typical.  Both the St. Louis and the Fort Wayne seminary will quote ad nausea Isaiah 6:8…

View original 576 more words

Call Day Placement Services

April 22, 2012

Per the Missouri District of the LCMS notification:

Spring 2012 Placement Services:

Concordia Theological Seminary, Ft. Wayne

The Vicarage and Deaconess Internship Placement Service will take place Tuesday, May 1 at 7:00 p.m. in Kramer Chapel with Rev. Jacob R. Sutton, Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church, Terre Haute, Indiana, serving as the preacher.

The Candidate Call Service follows on Wednesday, May 2 at 7:00 p.m. in Kramer Chapel with Rev. Dr. James Baneck, North Dakota District President, serving as preacher.

The Deaconess Placement Service takes place on Thursday, May 17 at 10:00 a.m. in Kramer Chapel.

All three services will be available via the internet. Simply go to http://www.ctsfw.edu to see the schedule.

_________________________

Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, cordially invites the public to share in the joy of Call Day on Tuesday, May 1, 2012. Students who will serve as vicars or deaconess interns (a one-year internship) next year will receive their assignments during a 3:00 p.m. (CDT) worship service. Rev. Keith E. Kohlmeier, president of the Kansas District, will serve as preacher.

During a 7:00 p.m. worship service, candidates for the pastoral ministry will receive their first calls to serve as pastors, missionaries, and chaplains in The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS). One deaconess studies student will receive a call into the diaconal ministry. Dr. Jon T. Diefenthaler, president of the Southeastern District, will serve as preacher. Both services will be held in the Seminary’s Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus.

Those unable to attend may listen to the services online via the Seminary’s website (www.csl.edu). Both audio and video will be available. For more information, visit the Seminary’s website beginning two weeks prior to the services.

The vicarages and calls will be posted on Concordia Seminary’s website on May 1 at 9:00 p.m. Lists also will be emailed at the same time via the Seminary’s email list service, CSLNEWS. Those who desire to subscribe to CSLNEWS prior to the May 1 services in order to receive the lists may do so at the bottom of this email. A complete listing also will be featured in the spring/summer issue of Concordia Seminary magazine. Audio and video recordings of the sermons for both services will be available on the Seminary’s website within 24 hours.
For more information, contact creative services, Concordia Seminary, 801 Seminary Place, St. Louis, MO 63105; 314-505-7379; communications@csl.edu.

Call Day is May 1st at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis

March 22, 2012

CALL DAY IS MAY 1 AT CONCORDIA SEMINARY, ST. LOUIS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 20, 2012

ST. LOUIS—Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, cordially invites the public to share in the joy of Call Day on Tuesday, May 1, 2012. Students who will serve as vicars or deaconess interns (a one-year internship) next year will receive their assignments during a 3:00 p.m. (CDT) worship service. Rev. Keith E. Kohlmeier, president of the Kansas District, will serve as preacher.

During a 7:00 p.m. worship service, candidates for the pastoral ministry will receive their first calls to serve as pastors, missionaries, and chaplains in The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod (LCMS). One deaconess studies student will receive a call into the diaconal ministry. Dr. Jon T. Diefenthaler, president of the Southeastern District, will serve as preacher. Both services will be held in the Seminary’s Chapel of St. Timothy and St. Titus.

Those unable to attend may listen to the services online via the Seminary’s website (www.csl.edu). Both audio and video will be available. For more information, visit the Seminary’s website beginning two weeks prior to the services.

The vicarages and calls will be posted on Concordia Seminary’s website on May 1 at 9:00 p.m. Lists also will be emailed at the same time via the Seminary’s email list service, CSLNEWS. Those who desire to subscribe to CSLNEWS prior to the May 1 services in order to receive the lists may do so at the bottom of this email. A complete listing also will be featured in the spring/summer issue of Concordia Seminary magazine. Audio and video recordings of the sermons for both services will be available on the Seminary’s website within 24 hours.

For more information, contact creative services, Concordia Seminary, 801 Seminary Place, St. Louis, MO 63105; 314-505-7379; communications@csl.edu.

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To view or search the list archives, join or leave the list, or change your subscription options, see the web page at http://LISTSERV.CUIS.EDU/cgi-bin/wa?A0=CSLNEWS
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Thoughts on Daily postings

March 6, 2012

I’ve been tinkering with the idea of each day, blogging about one of the pericope readings from the 3 year series for the upcoming Sunday. I wrote down a format for the week that follows a little something like this…

Monday – Psalm
Tuesday – Old Testament
Wednesday – Epistle
Thursday – Gospel
Friday – Lectionary Summary and Suggested readings from the Book of Concord

That would be a bit of work in itself to accomplish, so stay tuned to see if I actually make time to do it.

Some thoughts on Logos 4 and BibleWorks 8

July 23, 2011

Disclaimer: The Author owns both BibleWorks 8 and Logos 4 Platinum. Various specs and prices come directly from the respective websites.

BibleWorks http://www.bibleworks.com

Logos http://www.logos.com

Pricing:

BibleWorks: Full DVD Version $349, Qualified group rate $250 (offered by the CSL Bookstore in the Fall Quarter) Note: BibleWorks 9 has just been released.

Logos: Full Version Varies based on the package chosen

Christian Home – Christian Home Library gives you everything you need to study what the Bible says about marriage, prayer, faith, parenting, home school, devotions, and so much more! Christian Home Library comes over 80 Bibles and Bible reference books worth over $1,300.00 in print. $149.95

Bible Study Library – Bible Study Library gives you the tools you need to dig deep into Scripture, with almost 275 books worth almost $4,500.00 in print! $264.95

Leader’s Library – Leader’s Library is a comprehensive set of books and tools available for busy pastors and church leaders, with almost 350 books worth over $5,000.00 in print! $324.95

Original Languages – Original Languages Library is a complete library of Greek, Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac, Latin, and English resources for advanced biblical research, with over 300 books, grammars, lexicons, and more worth over $4,500.00 in print! $415.95

Scholar’s Library – Our bestselling library just got better! Scholar’s Library is newly expanded for Logos Bible Software 4, with over 475 books and commentaries worth almost $8,000.00 in print-an incredible value! $629.95

Scholar’s Silver – Scholar’s Library: Silver is a massive library for serious pastors and scholars, with almost 775 books worth over $11,000.00 in print! $999.95

Scholar’s Gold – Scholar’s Library: Gold is a massive library for serious students and scholars of the Bible, with 950 books worth almost $15,000.00 in print! $1,379.95

Scholar’s Platinum – Put an entire bookcase of theological and biblical resources at your fingertips. Scholar’s Library: Platinum is a massive electronic library for serious scholars, with more than 1,200 books worth nearly $19,000.00 in print. $1,689.95

Portfolio – Logos Bible Software 4: Portfolio Edition represents a major milestone in the publication of biblical and theological reference books, with almost 1,650 books worth more than $31,000.00 in print! $4,290.00

System Requirements:

BibleWorks (http://www.bibleworks.com/content/sys-req.html)

  • Windows® XP/Vista/7 (Mac users require additional virtualization software such as Parallels, Fusion, VirtualBox, or Boot Camp. Mac and Linux users, please see below)
  • Minimum 1024×600 display
  • Minimum 512 MB RAM
  • 1 GB hard drive space free (15 GB for full install)
  • DVD drive
  • Internet Explorer® version 7
  • Internet connection for updates

 Logos (http://www.logos.com/support/techfaq)

The minimum requirements for running Logos 4 on a PC are:

  • Pentium 4 1 GHz (or AMD equivalent- 1.3 GHz or higher)
  • 1 GB RAM (2GB for Windows 7 & Vista)
  • Windows XP SP3
  • DVD drive
  • 12 GB hard drive space on local drive (May require additional space depending on your library).
  • 1024X600 Display
  • 256 MB DirectX 9 graphics device
  • Internet connection required for activation & updates

The recommended requirements for running Logos 4 on a PC are:

  • Core 2 Duo 2 GHz
  • 3GB+ RAM
  • Windows Vista or Windows 7
  • DVD drive
  • 1280X1024 display
  • 512MB DirectX10 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver
  • 20 GB hard drive space on local drive (May require additional space depending on your library).
  • Broadband internet connection

The minimum requirements for running Logos 4 on a Mac

  • Mac OS X 10.5
  • Intel only (PowerPC not supported)
  • 2GB RAM
  • 12 GB hard drive space on local drive (May require additional space depending on your library).
  • DVD-ROM

The recommended requirements for running Logos 4 on a Mac

  • Mac OS X 10.6
  • Core 2 Duo 2 GHz
  • 4GB RAM
  • 20 GB hard drive space on local drive (May require additional space depending on your library).
  • DVD-ROM

Note: Logos 4 base packages can be downloaded immediately after purchase. Here are the download sizes for each of our collections:

Resources

Logos has digitized thousands of dollars-worth of print books consisting of millions of pages that fit nicely onto your laptop. BibleWorks has made language, diagram, and exegetical work so quick and easy that one is able to wrestle with the text itself longer before reading what others have said about it. Logos is always adding new products to their ever expanding library. They also run sales from time to time and offer what they call pre-pub sales in which you can purchase new titles for a much cheaper price than what the product will regularly run. BibleWorks only offers a handful of add-ins because their subject matter is much smaller than that of Logos.

If you compare the add-ins that they have in common, the base price is cheaper at BibleWorks. If you factor in the CSL discount (ask IT) on Logos, then they are almost dead even. Head-to-head, I would give the advantage to Logos because of the wider audience that they appeal to and the quantitatively more add-ins overall.

Bible/Word Study

Logos has similar functions in terms of exegesis and bible study tools that BibleWorks has. Logos certainly has more study tools about the bible than BibleWorks. However, I personally believe that if one is studying the Bible, he or she should wrestle more with the text rather than seek another’s understanding of what the Bible is saying. BibleWorks is much more equipped for intense Bible study than Logos.

Usability

At first, Bibleworks 8 is difficult to use and Logos is pretty much ready to go. However, there is a learning curve to both. This again boils down to what you want and are looking for in Bible Software. I would give the early advantage to Logos and the learned advantage to BibleWorks.

Strengths and Weaknesses

BibleWorks 8

BibleWorks is strong in terms of the original language resources that come as part of its base package. It contains, for example, the Juoun-Muraoka Hebrew Grammar, the Waltke and O’Connor Hebrew Syntax, and the Wallace Greek Grammar as part of its base package. The optional add-on modules available from BibleWorks are all related to original language research. BibleWorks is a no-frills program, and this no-frills approach makes it affordable. BibleWorks has an incredibly fast response time. It does searches of the biblical texts in milliseconds and gives you instant information from lexicons and grammars. In my opinion, it can’t be touched in terms of speed of access to lots of exegetical data.

The main weakness of BibleWorks is that it does not come in a Mac version. However, it can be run on a Mac by using software such as Parallels Desktop, but ideally, it could be offered in both a PC and Mac version. BibleWorks also does not yet have the syntax search capabilities available on Logos. The format for BibleWorks resources is poor. You cannot mark them up or take notes in them. BibleWorks has a lot of great resources, but they are very limited in what they offer in terms of types and number of resources. They have stepped it up recently, but are still far from being in the same league as Logos. I love having hundreds of commentaries as electronic resources. I use them daily.

Logos 4

Logos’s resources are great and enable you to do about as much to them as you can to your own print books—and more. You can underline, highlight in lots of different colors, and apply a limitless number of markups. You can also add notes within the resources. In addition, you can change the font and font size for easier reading. Logos is also the only program that currently has any kind of syntax search capability for the original languages. The Logos interface is one of the most intuitive of the two. It resembles a basic website interface. The amount and kind of resources is very helpful. To be able to do a search and see results in original language resources, commentaries, sermon illustration books, etc. is a strong point. There are between 6000 and 7000+ resources available for Logos (The number actually grows daily). Logos cannot be touched in terms of the sheer amount of great resources that they offer. There’s no real alternative for one interested in building a primarily digital library. The syntax tools are great. They are going to significantly change the study of the original language texts—both (1) in what they can do that couldn’t be done before and (2) in saving time doing more efficiently what could be done before only very inefficiently.

The one of the main weaknesses of Logos is the cost. Even with the available discounts, the high price could be out of the reach of many pastors and seminary students who are trying to make ends meet. Some of which is being combated by offering payment plans. The other weakness of Logos is a byproduct of one of its strengths – namely the large number of resources. In the first place, most users will probably find a large number of these resources to be extraneous. Second, the large number of resources slows down searches – sometimes dramatically. Another weakness is speed, but this is only due to the vast amount of resources included with each package.

Recommendations:

For the seminarian or pastor who is using a PC, I would recommend investing long term in Logos. It has all of the tools of BibleWorks with the added benefit of commentaries, word studies, and research resources. My next follow up blog will include some of the resources that may be of assistance for LCMS parishioners, teachers, deaconesses, seminarians, and pastors.

Holy Week Reflections

April 20, 2011

Every once in a while there are days or weeks were it is quite noticeable to us to that their is a change in our lives. We all go through changes in our day to day lives. However, what I am speaking of right now is that sequence of moments that literally changes us. This Holy Week has thus far been one of those weeks for me.

Palm Sunday marked the first time in a long time, I was able to sit back and watch the people closest in my life serve God in their own unique ways. It is not that they don’t do it at other times. It just so happens I am right serving him leading the way. Very rarely do I get to sit back and observe my family serve their Lord with the gifts they have been blessed. Linda for first time since we moved to Saint Louis, MO sang with Faith Worship Team for three services. Linda is a vocalist on campus for one of the chapel worship teams. However, this is a little different in my eyes. When we moved for this next step in our lives, Linda literally took a step back from singing in church. Some of it had to do with schedules, life adjustments, and quite possibly culture shock. Needless to say, my heart jumped for joy watching her using her God given gift of music again.

On top of Linda singing, for the 9:15 a.m. service Hannah, Jonathan, Hailey, and Jocelyn ALL participated and sang as part of Faith’s Kidnection which included children in the grades ranging from preschool to sixth grade. For those of you who have multiple children, this may hit home a bit more for you. You will understand the struggles of getting multiple children to stand still and smiling for pictures. Many times it can be harder for young children to stand up, even amongst their peers, in front of a congregation to sing. i am here to report that no one cried, whined, or had an down right meltdown. All stood up there dressed in their Sunday best. They opened their mouths and sang to God. As I stood in the back, I fought back the tears like any proud father, it occurred to me to take a picture of all the children. Little moments like this help to wipe away all the doubts of effective parenting. With Linda up front, it meant for once I was all by myself in the midst of the church with the children. Another one of those things that has not happen since before we moved here.

Holy Monday brought a wonderful chapel service, but it was the Tenebrae service in the chapel that left a lasting effect. Four seminarians and Dean Burresson read the Gospel lesson, Matthew 26:1-27:66. For some reason the way each part was broken up conveyed a new understanding of the text. It is a different realization of just reading the text or hearing someone else read it from the lectern. The betrayal, disappointment, denial, suffering, and death all meant so much more. I found myself re-reading this text a few more times after returning home. It is no secret, that I enjoy hearing my fellow seminarians preach. On Monday, 4th year seminarian delivered a very soul convicting and thought provoking sermon. I have been in a couple of classes with Sam throughout the year. He is one of those guys where you always know where you stand in his eyes. His sermon was much of the same approach. His sermon cut straight to the core of the matter.

Holy Wednesday (today) yield a chapel service patterned after the chief service for Good Friday. Dr. Bode preached, but I think the earlier readings, kneeling, and prayers took my mine elsewhere. Mine has lingered on the Good Friday sermon I have been preparing for a few weeks now. Something cleared up my mind locking in the missing part of the sermon for me. Not to worry, my mind was not on something else for long. I managed to link back into his message. I will just say there has been more reflection than in years past throughout Lent. Maybe it is the upcoming Call Day, baby births, weddings, or graduations that has caused the reflection. I know all the instruction I have received thus far, the praying, and the studying have and will continue to have a lasting effect… Yes, I know that is what “formation” is all about… Knowing it and realizing it is happening to you when it is happening to you are two different things.

I know all to well that God continues to take care of my family and I in every way. I have watched personally how he works in the lives of friends and family, both here at seminary and back home. I read scriptures, only to be left in awe in chesed/hesed (steadfast love) God has for us. What is next? The rest of Holy Week. Pray for me as I deliver my first Good Friday message. I am pretty excited to see how God will use me on Friday. I wonder how I will be formed next? Who am I fooling? I am pretty excited to see what He has prepared for me next!

How can I end this post without a countdown to Call Day and Vicarage Service: 13 Days, 18 Hours, 29 minutes, 30 seconds

Blog Views

January 26, 2011

Wow, since I started the blog there has 1940 views. Not to shabby considering the huge dead periods I have had over time. Oddly enough the biggest surge happened during the 2010 LCMS Convention. Odd…


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